Sunday 17 February 2019

Phil Lynott's life and legacy to be charted in new film from 'The Farthest' director

Thin Lizzy band members Brian Downey, Phil Lynott and Gary Moore
Thin Lizzy band members Brian Downey, Phil Lynott and Gary Moore

Esther McCarthy

He is one of rock's greatest and most charismatic icons, with a career that went from humble beginnings in Dublin to sold-out stadiums all over the world.

Now the story of Phil Lynott's musical career and legacy - and his personal challenges - is to be made into a movie.

Emmy award-winning Irish film-maker Emer Reynolds - who previously made Voyager space documentary The Farthest - is working on a feature-length documentary about the star.

Phil Lynott: Songs For While I'm Away will trace how the young black boy from working-class 1950s Dublin became the frontman of rock band Thin Lizzy and one of the best-loved rockers this country has ever produced.

Makings of a supergroup: Thin Lizzy's Brian Robertson, Phil Lynott and Scott Gorham in 1978. Lynott and Gorham both performed as part of The Greedy Bastards
Makings of a supergroup: Thin Lizzy's Brian Robertson, Phil Lynott and Scott Gorham in 1978. Lynott and Gorham both performed as part of The Greedy Bastards

It will also focus on some of his greatest hits such as Old Town and Still In Love With You.

Featuring contributions from family, friends and peers, the documentary will celebrate the personality, successes and legacy of the star, who died aged only 36 in 1986.

A number of stars have already been lined up to take part in the project, including fellow band members, U2's Adam Clayton, Metallica star James Hetfield - himself a major fan - and friends and musical collaborators Midge Ure and Huey Lewis.

"Having been a huge Thin Lizzy fan throughout my life, it's an incredible honour to be bringing this intimate portrait of lead singer and songwriter Philip Lynott to the big screen," said director Reynolds.

The film will tell the story of Lynott's journey to England and the success of the band as well as his solo years.

His legacy is embodied in his influence cited by bands such as Metallica, Foo Fighters, Smashing Pumpkins and Def Leppard among others, as well as a statue erected in his honour in Harry Street, just off Grafton Street.

Read more: The last night of Irish punk? Remembering this end-of-an-era gig 40 years ago

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