Monday 16 September 2019

Last Wednesday, Magnus Carlsen successfully defended his title in London. After all 12 games with classical time control were drawn, the champion dominated the rapid chess tie-break, beating Fabiano Caruana 3-0. This is the second time Carlsen has done that - in 2016 he defeated Sergey Karjakin 3-1 in the rapid chess tie-break as well.

Alexander Baburin

Last Wednesday, Magnus Carlsen successfully defended his title in London. After all 12 games with classical time control were drawn, the champion dominated the rapid chess tie-break, beating Fabiano Caruana 3-0. This is the second time Carlsen has done that - in 2016 he defeated Sergey Karjakin 3-1 in the rapid chess tie-break as well.

In this column I usually show chess miniatures, and such games are usually won by White. However, Black can win quickly too - with a lot of courage and a bit of help from the opponent. The following game, played a week ago in Belgrade, is a good example of that. In it, a 16-year-old Turkish player defeated a 23-year-old Bosnian Grandmaster, who was rated 350 points higher than him.

Kadric - Gunduz

1.f4 e5!? 2.fxe5 d6

3.exd6 Bxd6 4.Nf3 g5

The From's Gambit is a good way to counter 1.f2-f4 as now White needs to defend, which is never easy in chess.

5.g3 g4 6.Nh4 Ne7

7.e4 Ng6 8.Nf5 Bxf5

9.exf5 Ne5 10.Be2?

This move is too timid, White should have gone for 10.d4 Nf3+ 11.Kf2 instead.

10...Nbc6 11.c3 Bc5

12.d4 Qd5 13.Rf1

Again, 13.Kf2 was the better move.

13...0-0-0 14.Be3 Rhe8

15.Kf2 Qe4 16.Re1 (D)

White probably felt that his d-pawn was providing him enough cover, but with his next move Black cut the Gordian knot:

16...Nxd4! 17.cxd4 Rxd4

18.Qc1 Nd3+ 19.Bxd3 Qf3+

20.Kg1 Rxe3! 21.Qxe3 Re4 0-1

Sunday Independent

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