| 6.8°C Dublin

Hunt Showdown review: Macabre shot at battle royale

XO/PS4/PC ★★★★ Age: 18+

Close

Hunt: Showdown

Hunt: Showdown

Hunt: Showdown

People forget Fortnite was first a failure. The pop-culture phenomenon began life as a zombie survival game before jumping on the battle royale bandwagon when PUBG swept the world. Hunt: Showdown went through similar pivots in its six-year gestation and it's now all the better for its macabre twist on the last-man-standing genre.

Set in the rotting bayous of a post-apocalypse Louisiana overrun by filthy ghouls, Hunt is not an experience for the queasy of stomach. Each mission sends you and up to two other team-mates to scour swamps and abandoned farm buildings ripe with corpses, trash and zombies in the search for the boss creature to slay for a bounty.

Trouble is, several other hunters have the same task and what follows is a tense hide-and-seek as each group stealthily seeks clues to the creature's whereabouts. Confrontations generate noise, attracting zombies but, more dangerously, the other players. Even when the boss beast - a terrifying spider, a corpulent butcher-demon, a self-cloning assassin - goes down and you claim the bounty, you face a panicked sprint to the extraction point with a target on your back.

Hunt suffers a lot due to its lack of variety - just three bosses and two maps. But there's something grimly compulsive about its grotesque locations - the horrifying charnel houses and their eerie undead - that amplifies the taut PUBG-esque gameplay. It's the sort of shooter that leaves the nerves jangling and the lungs breathless.



Deathtrap Dungeon

PC/Mac ★★★★ Age: 15+

Close

Deathtrap Dungeon stars Eddie Marsan

Deathtrap Dungeon stars Eddie Marsan

Deathtrap Dungeon stars Eddie Marsan

A choose-your-own-adventure medieval yarn, narrated with gravity and a hint of mischief by British character actor Eddie Marsan? Sign me up.

Deathtrap Dungeon is a full-motion video version of the long-running series of role-playing paperback books created by genre maestros Ian Livingstone and Steve Jackson. You're an adventurer navigating a tricky series of trials in a Thai cave where Marsan is effectively your proxy.

Make a decision - drink a potion, fight a goblin, jump a chasm - and Marsan chronicles the outcome. It's fairly standard RPG stuff that admittedly leans heavily on the novelty of the video clips. But Marsan's earnest and endlessly watchable performance lifts it to a different level.


Indo Review