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Rachel English pays tribute to Cathy Murray at her book launch

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Rachel English

last day presenting Five Seven Live

Pic: Mark Condren

18/8/2006

rte radio studio

Rachel English last day presenting Five Seven Live Pic: Mark Condren 18/8/2006 rte radio studio

English has signed a two-book deal with Orion, one of the biggest publishers in Britain.

English has signed a two-book deal with Orion, one of the biggest publishers in Britain.

Rachel English last day presenting Five Seven Live Pic: Mark Condren 18/8/2006 rte radio studio

PRESENTER Rachael English has expressed her shock and sadness at the death of her ‘Morning Ireland’ colleague Cathy Murray.

The RTE Radio One anchor told the Irish Independent that the programme's team are still coming to terms with the news of Ms Murray's passing on Monday night.

English described the deceased, sister of sports pundit Colm Murray, as one of the "most positive people I knew".

Speaking at the launch of her novel ‘Going Back’ in Dublin last night, where she also paid tribute to the late broadcast co-ordinator, English said that it is difficult to find words that accurately define Murray and her bubbly personality.

"When somebody dies as suddenly as that and somebody who was so full of life, it's terribly tragic," she said.

"It's easy to be spirited if things are going you're way, but Cathy had a very rough couple of years helping with Colm and his illness after he was diagnosed with Motor Neurone Disease. But you'd never guess in a million years when she came into work that there was something butting in. She was probably facing into a really long day with Colm after being up early to come in for the show - it's just desperate.

"She was a wonderful, extraordinary person and will be greatly missed," she said.

English also commented on last night's 'Prime Time' special report, which investigated creches in the greater Dublin area and their treatment towards children in their care.

The radio host said that she's happy to see the return of undercover reports to the RTE television programme.

"They've clearly put an awful lot of work into it and it's good to see such commitment to that kind of reporting given everything that's happened. I think people wondered, legitimately, whether they'd get as stuck into anything out of fear," she said.

The broadcaster-turned-author said that while she has thoroughly enjoyed the process of publishing her book, she was exceptionally nervous about the finished product.

"It's the worry of people you know reading it and seeing their reaction. I didn't think I'd be as nervous as I was."

Online Editors