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Complicit: Hollywood insider delves into the murky waters of #MeToo

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Winnie M Li. Photo by Grace Gelder

Winnie M Li. Photo by Grace Gelder

Complicit by Winnie M Li

Complicit by Winnie M Li

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Winnie M Li. Photo by Grace Gelder

If a writer invented a fictional Harvey Weinstein, with his hulking frame, crude manners and lust for power, he would be so obviously monstrous that he would seem like a symbol of toxic masculinity rather than a believable character with human feelings and understandable motivations. No wonder novelists prefer to draw on real-life scandals, which give them a chance to explore power dynamics and social forces that are difficult to render in words without becoming didactic. Readers, in turn, love these books because they satisfy our desire to peek behind the curtain and see the messy human element that everyone’s competing PR campaigns are trying to hide.

But there’s another reason we get hooked on these stories: we want them to end. We want resolutions and lessons learned, we want good to triumph and evil to be punished.


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