Thursday 12 December 2019

Actor Simon Delaney admits he was an unexpected choice to front TV3's recent series 'Tales of Irish Castles', which saw the former 'Bachelor's Walk' star explore some of our country's oldest and crumbliest keeps. "I'm not a historian," he said. "I thought Strongbow was a type of cider before I started this show. They chose me because I'm reliable and, more importantly, cheap."

Actor Simon Delaney admits he was an unexpected choice to front TV3's recent series 'Tales of Irish Castles', which saw the former 'Bachelor's Walk' star explore some of our country's oldest and crumbliest keeps. "I'm not a historian," he said. "I thought Strongbow was a type of cider before I started this show. They chose me because I'm reliable and, more importantly, cheap."

'Great British Bake Off' host Paul Hollywood was left red-faced when he took to the Olympia stage this week with his 'Get Your Bake On' tour. The BBC star began telling the audience an innocuous story about his 12-year-old son Josh, affectionately referring to him as "my lad".

Needless to say, this caused much amusement in the stalls.

Unaware of the word's double entendre in Ireland, Hollywood (inset) ignored the stifled laughter and moved on.

But the mistake was highlighted later on in the show when he decided to read out tweets sent to him by audience members. "You do know that 'my lad' means your willy in Ireland?" he read aloud.

Stunned, the presenter turned to the crowd: "Is this true? I don't believe it. I've been talking about my lad all day."

Author Joseph O'Connor is surrounded by creative genius.

Apart from his own novels, his wife is writer Anne-Marie Casey, his sister, Dr Eimear O'Connor, is a distinguished art historian and won widespread acclaim for her biopic on Sean Keating, and his father's memoir 'Growing Up So High' went down a treat when it hit book shelves last year.

And his sister is singer and songwriter Sinead.

But O'Connor is hopeful his own children opt for a more stable vocation and leave the creative world of writing behind. "I would like them to grow up to be accountants or tribunal lawyers," he said.

"Something nice and safe so they can look after us when we are old and poor. I pray every day, 'Please God, let them become actuaries'."

Forget Irish Water, this week, national outrage swept the country when punters discovered that Jacobs Biscuits had removed the iconic 'jelly star' from their festive Afternoon Tea biscuit tin. Is nothing sacred?

The colourful star has been replaced with a 'chocolate wheel' and Irish biscuit lovers have been begging Jacobs to reconsider the decision.

"Irish people are very attached to biscuits," a spokesperson for Jacobs said. "The loss of the jelly star is upsetting but we're sure they will come to love the chocolate wheel just as much."

Give us time, Jacobs, the pain is still fresh.

Irish Independent

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