Wednesday 13 December 2017

H&M bans clothes from Indian spinning mill accused of child labour

edestrians carrying Hennes & Mauritz AB (H&M) shopping bags cross Canton Road in the Tsim Sha Tsui area of Hong Kong, China, on Wednesday, Oct. 15, 2014. Hong Kong police said they would investigate a complaint alleging excessive use of force against a pro-democracy protester, after they used pepper spray and batons to retake a key road in seeking an end to an almost three-week occupation of parts of the city. Photographer: Brent Lewin/Bloomberg
edestrians carrying Hennes & Mauritz AB (H&M) shopping bags cross Canton Road in the Tsim Sha Tsui area of Hong Kong, China, on Wednesday, Oct. 15, 2014. Hong Kong police said they would investigate a complaint alleging excessive use of force against a pro-democracy protester, after they used pepper spray and batons to retake a key road in seeking an end to an almost three-week occupation of parts of the city. Photographer: Brent Lewin/Bloomberg

Hennes & Mauritz AB will blacklist a spinning mill in India after a report claimed five manufacturers there use child labour and subjected workers, mostly women and girls, to "appalling" working conditions.

Sweden's H&M will ban suppliers from using products made by Tamil Nadu-based Super Spinning Mills, the retail giant said yesterday.

A Bangladeshi supplier has used yarn produced at the mill, though H&M doesn't have a direct business agreement, a H&M spokeswoman said.

Super was "unwilling to co-operate with H&M in a transparent way," it said.

The decision follows a report by the Centre for Research on Multinational Corporations and the India Committee of the Netherlands which said workers face conditions "that amount to forced labour in the export-oriented southern Indian textile industry".

"This report is totally false," Super Spinning Mills' managing director AS Thirumoorthy said by phone. "Buyers from H&M and Decathlon regularly come and audit our facilities."

The mill complies with all Indian regulations relating to labour, and does not employ any children below the age of 15, Thirumoorthy said.

Irish Independent

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