Monday 16 July 2018

Go ahead for union's Deliveroo rider case

Deliveroo said the judge upheld the CAC's central finding that its 15,000 riders in Britain are self-employed. Photo: PA
Deliveroo said the judge upheld the CAC's central finding that its 15,000 riders in Britain are self-employed. Photo: PA

Costas Pitas

The English High Court ruled yesterday that a British trade union should be granted a judicial review of a decision not to allow it to represent delivery riders at food courier Deliveroo as it pushes for worker rights in the gig economy.

The Independent Workers Union of Great Britain (IWGB) is seeking to represent delivery riders in Camden, London, hoping to secure for them rights such as the minimum wage, an increasingly thorny issue in Britain, where more people are working without fixed contracts.

Like ride-sharing service Uber and other internet-based services, Deliveroo's model is based on its use of self- employed couriers, rather than having a standing staff of employees.

In November, Britain's Central Arbitration Committee (CAC) rejected the move, which could act as a test case, and the IWGB had gone to the High Court to seek a judicial review, which it lost in May.

However, a High Court judge yesterday granted the judicial review, in a move welcomed by IWGB general secretary Jason Moyer-Lee.

"We have been given permission to argue that Deliveroo is breaching our members' human rights... We are not giving up," he said in a video message posted on Twitter.

Deliveroo said the judge upheld the CAC's central finding that its 15,000 riders in Britain are self-employed.

"The court has allowed a limited challenge on human rights grounds," said a spokesman.

"Deliveroo has long argued that the self-employed should have access to greater protections, and we welcome any debate on how that can best be achieved," the company said.

Irish Independent

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