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Deutsche Bank calls time on remote working ‘honeymoon phase’

Increased usage of public transit systems seen as a sign workers are getting back to their desks

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Morning commuters wear protective face masks on a RER metro train in Paris, France, on Wednesday, June 9, 2021. Talks with labor unions are underway for a broad framework agreement on working from home, l’Obs reported, citing an interview with Labor Minister Elisabeth Borne. Photographer: Nathan Laine/Bloomberg

Morning commuters wear protective face masks on a RER metro train in Paris, France, on Wednesday, June 9, 2021. Talks with labor unions are underway for a broad framework agreement on working from home, l’Obs reported, citing an interview with Labor Minister Elisabeth Borne. Photographer: Nathan Laine/Bloomberg

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Deutsche Bank is calling the end of the honeymoon phase for employees’ relationship with remote work.

A growing number of workers report feeling isolated from colleagues, Deutsche Bank said in a report to clients.

Women are increasingly likely to develop musculoskeletal problems due to inadequate remote-work setups. Nearly 40pc of workers in the US say they feel exhausted after a full week of virtual meetings.

“Despite our initial honeymoon, people are starting to realise that the freedom of work-from-home does have some downsides: dilution of company culture, coordination issues, and even the mental wellbeing of some workers,” Marion Laboure, an analyst at Deutsche Bank, said in the report.

A proprietary survey conducted by the firm showed people expect to continue working from home two to three day s a week once the pandemic is no longer deemed a threat. The firm now expects offices in major financial hubs to refill quickly, pointing to increased usage on public transit systems as a sign that workers are getting back to their desks.

“Work-from-home has brought new freedoms, saved some extra cash by cutting out commutes,” Ms Laboure said.

“However, concerns surrounding mental health, the hurting of inner-city businesses, new graduates unable to connect with their peers and even vulnerability to cyber attacks have led to questions about whether our honeymoon with work-from-home is drawing to a close.”

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