Tuesday 20 February 2018

What does a bigger screen size mean for everyday use?

The new Samsung S8
The new Samsung S8
Adrian Weckler

Adrian Weckler

Samsung's new flagship smartphones mean that we are likely to spend even more time glued to our handsets rather than laptops, tablets or TVs.

The new S8 comes in 5.8-inch and 6.2-inch versions. To put that in perspective, the screen on Apple's iPhone 7 models are currently 4.7 inches and 5.5 inches (for the 'Plus' models).

The incessant nudging upwards of screen sizes is already having a transformative effect on how we use our phones.

One of Netflix's most senior executives, Neil Hunt, recently said that mobile screens are now the majority consumption devices for Netflix in some countries, including India and parts of Asia. In response, the movie streaming giant, which is estimated to have over 200,000 Irish subscribers, is to start looking at special mobile-friendly versions of its most popular shows.

The reason that screens are getting bigger is because that's what people want. In many European countries and the US, adults between the age of 18 to 24 now spend more time looking at their smartphone than they do in front of a TV set. Even for older generations, the phone is catching TV, with recent Nielsen figures showing that those between 35 and 50 spend 18 hours weekly looking at smartphones compared to 28 hours on television sets. Only the over-65s continue to watch physical TV sets by the same dominant margin as they have traditionally done, according to Nielsen.

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