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Forget Twitter - Beyonce is happier on Instagram

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Jane McDaid, Founder Thinkhouse and Lauren Wirtzer  head of digital for Beyonce at the Fringe Summit in the Odessa Club in Dublin. Picture:Arthur Carron

Jane McDaid, Founder Thinkhouse and Lauren Wirtzer head of digital for Beyonce at the Fringe Summit in the Odessa Club in Dublin. Picture:Arthur Carron

Jane McDaid, Founder Thinkhouse and Lauren Wirtzer head of digital for Beyonce at the Fringe Summit in the Odessa Club in Dublin. Picture:Arthur Carron

When it comes to social media's warring tribes, pop sensation Beyonce is an Instagram girl through and through.

Despite having close to 13.7 million Twitter followers, Queen Bey's account remains pretty dormant.

In fact, since joining the social media networking site in April 2012, Beyonce has tweeted a total of eight times, usually regarding charity events including World Humanitarian Day and more recently Chime for Change.

It may seem bizarre for the 'Drunk in Love' singer to neglect the hugely popular platform but it's all part and parcel of maintaining a sense of equilibrium at 'Brand Beyonce' HQ.

Speaking at Thinkhouse's Youth Lab session last night, Lauren Wirtzer-Seawood, head of digital strategy at Beyonce's creative company Parkwood Entertainment, explained: "Instagram is Beyonce's favourite way of communicating with her fans.

"It gives them insight and access without starting conversations," she said.

"It makes her accessible in an inaccessible way."

Wirtzer-Seawood went on to explain that the staff of 20 at Parkwood Entertainment believed Instagram was a more expressive medium than Twitter and allowed Beyonce to connect with her 19.5 million followers.

"Saying things in 140 characters on Twitter can be restrictive, things can get lost.

"Posting an image allows fans to read into it what they want. Beyonce's just more comfortable on Instagram."

Taking care of Queen Bey and "The Beyhive" - that's Queen Bey's devoted online fan base - is a non-stop gig.

But Wirtzer-Seawood is well up for the job; she began her career working at Quincy Jones's iconic music magazine 'Vibe' before landing a job as an assistant at Def Jam Records.

"I did everything from taking out trash to answering phone calls from artists' angry girlfriends," she laughed.

She went on to manage the non-music Def Jam businesses on behalf of Russell Simmons, Lyor Cohen and Kevin Liles. She left company after 15 years to join Beyonce's crew.

Irish Independent