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Porn software can detect sex-addicted employees

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New software can detect porn being watched by employees online. Picture posed

New software can detect porn being watched by employees online. Picture posed

New software can detect porn being watched by employees online. Picture posed

With Ireland ranking top of the list for searches of the word ‘porn’ on Google, the country’s employers will be interested in newly-developed porn-detecting software.



A significant amount of ‘unsuitable’ material is downloaded by employees during business hours, according to research.

Currently, under ‘Google Trends’ Ireland ranks No 1 on the list of searches for the word ‘porn’, beating New Zeland (No 2) and the UK (No 3) to achieve the uneviable top spot.

As employers increasingly move to block well-known social networking sites such as Facebook, youtube, and Bebo, there is obvious awareness amongst managers that surfing the web is an addiction for many employees.

But a more dangerous addiction is a fascination with the myriad porn sites now sweeping the web. As well as porn cutting down on an employee’s creativity and productivity levels, there are also fears that discovery by colleagues could lead to claims of sexual harassment or hostile work environments.

The realisation that porn downloads could result in firms losing money, as well as time, has demanded a greater response from software researchers.

US software firm Paraben has announced its development of software developed to detect and analyse images which may cause offence. The system grades and identifies ‘problem’ sites or data. The software might also be adapted for forensic use in criminal investigations, according to Utah-based Paraben.

If the software is successful in helping companies to avoid very costly harassment or even disciplinary cases, it is bound to become a staple of employers’ IT security in the near future, say observers.

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