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Parents warned of hacking risk from Minecraft

Minecraft has warned that a newly-discovered security flaw could make some computers vulnerable to being taken over by hackers.

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Minecraft has urged players using PCs to close and reopen the game because of a new security flaw

Minecraft has urged players using PCs to close and reopen the game because of a new security flaw

Minecraft has urged players using PCs to close and reopen the game because of a new security flaw

Parents have been warned that their kids’ use of Minecraft on family computers could let in a new deadly security virus.

Microsoft, which owns Minecraft, confirmed that some versions of the world’s best-selling game are vulnerable to a new online security flaw that could give control of the computer to hackers.

“The vulnerability poses a potential risk of your computer being compromised,” said Minecraft in a statement.

The security flaw, Apache Log4j exploit, has been the subject of multiple international cybersecurity warnings, including one from Ireland’s National Cyber Security Centre.

“It is likely that malicious actors will shortly begin using this vulnerability to attack webservers,” the NCSC said. “The NCSC advises that organisations assess their web servers for exposure to this risk.”

The flaw is said to have the capability to affect dozens of mainstream popular services.

However, Microsoft has confirmed that versions of Minecraft played on smartphones, tablets or games consoles are not at risk.

And it said that most Minecraft players on laptops or home PCs could avoid the Apache Log4j exploit security flaw by simply closing down the game completely, including the ‘Minecraft Launcher’ and starting again. Microsoft said that the relaunched version would be ‘patched’ with the correct, secure version.

“This is not a rare occurrence,” said Michele Neylon, CEO of Ireland’s largest web hosting company, Blacknight. “Software is constantly evolving, as are the attacks on the systems that use it. In the case of Log4J it’s very widely used so it’s a major headache for many companies.”

However, the Department of Communications today said that there are no signs yet of serious damage.

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“There is no evidence of any successful exploitation of this vulnerability in the State, or any effect on services or data, but the risk of eventual compromise will persist for any entity until the vulnerability is addressed,” said a notice from the Department.



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