Sunday 22 April 2018

Men think it's good to talk - but women turn to WhatsApp

Nine out of 10 Irish adults will text, instant message or call from a mobile when they want to get in touch with someone, with just 3pc choosing the landline first. Stock Image: Getty Images
Nine out of 10 Irish adults will text, instant message or call from a mobile when they want to get in touch with someone, with just 3pc choosing the landline first. Stock Image: Getty Images
Adrian Weckler

Adrian Weckler

Men prefer to talk on phones more than women, despite the old stereotypes.

New research shows more men will opt to speak on a phone, while women are now choosing instant messaging services such as WhatsApp instead. The research shows almost half of men call up friends or associates to get in touch, while under a third of women do. It also shows phones are taking over our perception of self-worth, with a growing number of Irish people saying it's not a real experience if they can't show it off online through their handset.

Almost a third of us now say that we're upset if we can't "share an amazing experience with followers".

Previous research from Expedia showed three-quarters of holidaymakers now feel they need to post to social media when away, even if it interrupts their holiday.

Handsets such as iPhones are becoming so tied up in our sense of worth that a growing number of us say we would want "over €500 per month" to be persuaded to part with our mobile device.

However, 54pc of Irish people admit their phones stop them getting to sleep.

The survey shows Snapchat remains a mystery to many people over the age of 35. Only one in 20 people over that age use the service, compared with over half of those under 25. Facebook is the only social media service used by over 55s, with almost a third of older people using the network to check in on friends and news.

Instant messaging services such as WhatsApp have replaced SMS messages for all but the over 45s, with the majority opting for free online communications over paid-for texts, which can still cost up to 10c per SMS message with Irish mobile operators.

Meanwhile, two out of five of us don't use landline phones any more. Even older people are ditching their home phones, with a quarter of those over 55 no longer using a traditional landline handset anymore.

Nine out of 10 Irish adults will text, instant message or call from a mobile when they want to get in touch with someone, with just 3pc choosing the landline first.

The findings are based on a survey by Amarach of 1,000 Irish people on behalf of Three.

Irish Independent

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