Business Technology

Sunday 16 December 2018

New 'supersized' iPhone could cost €1,500 as Apple gets ready to launch

  

Concept: Artist’s impressions of the revamped iPhone X and its larger cousin, the iPhone Xs Max. Photo: iDropNews
Concept: Artist’s impressions of the revamped iPhone X and its larger cousin, the iPhone Xs Max. Photo: iDropNews
Adrian Weckler

Adrian Weckler

Apple is tipped to unveil a new giant smartphone this week as part of an array of gadgets it will launch.

Industry leaks show that the new phone, dubbed the iPhone XS Max, will have a whopping 6.5-inch screen, making it almost the same size as some small tablets.

However, its cost could reach a new record for a smartphone at about €1,500.

The new phone will have a better camera, more storage and more power. It is also likely to have a better battery, a feature many complain about. Tech analysts say the new supersized phone is partly designed to get us to watch more television on our phones. Recent figures suggest that services such as Netflix, YouTube and Sky Go now have hundreds of thousands of mobile daily users in Ireland, with average phone screens in Ireland having increased by almost 50pc in the last three years.

Apple's current highest-priced phone is the iPhone X, which costs from €1,179. Irish mobile operators recently rejected a high-end version of Samsung's new flagship Note 9 phone, saying it was too expensive. Traditionally, Apple customers have been willing to spend more on their devices.

Apple is also set to release two additional new iPhones, comprising a straight upgrade to its current 5.8-inch iPhone X and a new 6.1-inch model that is designed like the iPhone X but has slightly lower specifications to enable a cheaper price.

It is also said to be unveiling a new, larger Apple Watch, with a new MacBook, Mac Mini and iPad Pro also touted.

Ireland will have a key role in the iPhone's rollout, with the Cork base co-ordinating the rollout of the phones from the factories in China to large chunks of the globe.

Managers in Cork will oversee thousands of planes and trucks bringing the devices from China to retail outlets. The Cork facility oversees hundreds of millions of Apple products being shipped each year.

Irish Independent

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