Business Technology

Tuesday 10 December 2019

MH370 search set to probe 1,000 possible flight paths

Co-Pilot, Flying Officer Marc Smith (R) and crewmen aboard a Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) AP-3C Orion aircraft, search for the missing Malaysian Airlines Flight MH370 over the southern Indian Ocean. Months of searches have failed to turn up any trace of the missing aircraft, which disappeared on March 8. There are 1,000 possible flight paths the plane may have taken before crashing into the Indian Ocean. Photo credit: REUTERS/Richard Wainwright/Pool/Files
Co-Pilot, Flying Officer Marc Smith (R) and crewmen aboard a Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) AP-3C Orion aircraft, search for the missing Malaysian Airlines Flight MH370 over the southern Indian Ocean. Months of searches have failed to turn up any trace of the missing aircraft, which disappeared on March 8. There are 1,000 possible flight paths the plane may have taken before crashing into the Indian Ocean. Photo credit: REUTERS/Richard Wainwright/Pool/Files

Tom Phillips

Six months after the disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, the man leading the operation to find it has admitted that there are 1,000 possible flight paths it may have taken before crashing into the Indian Ocean.

Martin Dolan, the chief commissioner of the Australian Transport Safety Bureau, which is co-ordinating the search, said his team faced an "intimidating" and "unprecedented" challenge as it prepared to launch a one-year offshore search operation that could cost up to €37m.

Asked if he could guarantee that the plane's wreckage would be found, Mr Dolan said: "I don't want to create a false hope. But I don't want to write it off either, because we do think we have a reasonable prospect."

MH370 disappeared on March 8. There were 227 passengers and 12 crew on board the Boeing 777.

Irish Independent

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