Sunday 10 December 2017

'Futuristic' cars powered by voice controls steal the show at CES in Las Vegas

The cars can even park themselves

A mock-up of an autonomous car interior is shown at the Panasonic booth during the 2017 CES in Las Vegas, Nevada, January 5, 2017. REUTERS/Steve Marcus
A mock-up of an autonomous car interior is shown at the Panasonic booth during the 2017 CES in Las Vegas, Nevada, January 5, 2017. REUTERS/Steve Marcus
Bob Carter, senior vice president of automotive operations at Toyota unveils the new Toyota Concept-i concept car, designed to learn about its driver is unveiled during the Toyota press conference at CES in Las Vegas, January 4, 2017. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Bob Carter, senior vice president of automotive operations at Toyota unveils the new Toyota Concept-i concept car, designed to learn about its driver is unveiled during the Toyota press conference at CES in Las Vegas, January 4, 2017. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Toyota unveils the new Toyota Concept-i concept car, designed to learn about its driver is unveiled during the Toyota press conference at CES in Las Vegas, January 4, 2017. L-R are Makoto Okabe, Toyota chief engineer, Ian Cartabiano, Studio Chief Designer at Calty Design Research Inc., Gill Pratt CEO Toyota Research Institute and Bob Carter, senior vice president of automotive operations. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Bob Carter, Senior Vice President of automotive operations at Toyota, unveils the new Toyota Concept-i concept car, designed to learn about its driver, during the Toyota press conference at CES in Las Vegas, January 4, 2017. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Bob Carter, Senior Vice President of automotive operations at Toyota, unveils the new Toyota Concept-i concept car, designed to learn about its driver, during the Toyota press conference at CES in Las Vegas, January 4, 2017. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Bob Carter, senior vice president of automotive operations at Toyota unveils the new Toyota Concept-i concept car, designed to learn about its driver is unveiled during the Toyota press conference at CES in Las Vegas, January 4, 2017. REUTERS/Rick Wilking

Martyn Landi, Press Association

Futuristic cars powered by voice controls that can read passenger emotions and drive themselves drew the biggest crowds on the first day of CES.

The technology trade show in Las Vegas opened its doors for the first time on Thursday, with around 170,000 visitors expected across four days.

Many flocked to car giant Toyota's booth to see the firm's Concept-i car, which instead of buttons and screens is interacted with using voice. The built-in virtual assistant Yui uses artificial intelligence to measure emotions based on passenger responses and alters the car's settings according, Toyota says.

Start-up Faraday Future also publicly showcased their first production car, an electric vehicle it says is capable of reaching 60mph in less than 2.4 seconds.

Bob Carter, senior vice president of automotive operations at Toyota unveils the new Toyota Concept-i concept car, designed to learn about its driver is unveiled during the Toyota press conference at CES in Las Vegas, January 4, 2017. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Bob Carter, senior vice president of automotive operations at Toyota unveils the new Toyota Concept-i concept car, designed to learn about its driver is unveiled during the Toyota press conference at CES in Las Vegas, January 4, 2017. REUTERS/Rick Wilking

The car also has autonomous features and can park itself.

However only 300 of the FF91, which the firm says will challenge Tesla, have so far been announced as going into production.

There were also concept cars on show from less traditional sources, as appliance firm Bosch presented a car it says could become the "third living space" alongside home and work.

The concept includes voice and facial recognition software to personalise the car, as well as driverless capabilities and an internet connection to enable passengers to carry out other tasks safely.

Bob Carter, senior vice president of automotive operations at Toyota unveils the new Toyota Concept-i concept car, designed to learn about its driver is unveiled during the Toyota press conference at CES in Las Vegas, January 4, 2017. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Bob Carter, senior vice president of automotive operations at Toyota unveils the new Toyota Concept-i concept car, designed to learn about its driver is unveiled during the Toyota press conference at CES in Las Vegas, January 4, 2017. REUTERS/Rick Wilking

Corning, a company that specialises in glass production - notably the Gorilla Glass used on some smartphones - also had a concept car on display.

The car had been fitted with Gorilla Glass windows and sunroof and windscreen, which Corning says reduces the car's weight by up to 30%, improving braking and fuel efficiency.

The windscreen also had augmented reality capabilities and could be used to display relevant information.

Bob Carter, senior vice president of automotive operations at Toyota unveils the new Toyota Concept-i concept car, designed to learn about its driver is unveiled during the Toyota press conference at CES in Las Vegas, January 4, 2017. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Bob Carter, senior vice president of automotive operations at Toyota unveils the new Toyota Concept-i concept car, designed to learn about its driver is unveiled during the Toyota press conference at CES in Las Vegas, January 4, 2017. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Bob Carter, Senior Vice President of automotive operations at Toyota, unveils the new Toyota Concept-i concept car, designed to learn about its driver, during the Toyota press conference at CES in Las Vegas, January 4, 2017. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Bob Carter, Senior Vice President of automotive operations at Toyota, unveils the new Toyota Concept-i concept car, designed to learn about its driver, during the Toyota press conference at CES in Las Vegas, January 4, 2017. REUTERS/Rick Wilking

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