Business Technology

Monday 11 December 2017

Apple 'planning Beats-powered streaming service'

An employee organises headphones in a Beats shop
An employee organises headphones in a Beats shop

Rhiannon Williams

Apple is working on a Beats-powered streaming service to rival Spotify, according to new reports.

The as yet-unnamed service will be integrated into iOS, iTunes and Apple TV, including an overhaul of the existing Music iOS app, rather than the iOS roll-out anticipated, reports 9to5Mac.

The cloud streaming service will prioritise a user's music library, integrating personal playlists and deploying a new search function for locating tracks within the iTunes/Beats catalogue.

Existing Beats Music accounts will be able to merge with iTunes or Apple ID accounts, though this only applies to US users and Beats Music is currently still unavailable to those based in the UK.

Apple is reportedly in charge of the aesthetics, bypassing Beats' signature red and black colour scheme to fit better with iOS design.

Share and collate health and fitness information through the Health app, complete with the

The Californian company purchased the music streaming service and headphones arm of Beats Electronics in May last year for $3.2bn (£1.8bn) - Apple's largest ever acquisition.

Though sizable the acquisition has yet to bear fruit. Beats announced the Solo2 wireless headphones in November, the first product since the lucrative deal, but they were largely identical to their previously released non-wireless Solo2 counterparts.

Consumers are increasingly opting to pay for subscription services over downloading individuals tracks or albums. Music subscription revenue increased 50 per cent to $1.1 billion in 2013, while downloads declined by 2 per cent in the same period.

Beats Music boasts around 250,000 paying customers in the US, while rival service Spotify has over 10 million subscribers worldwide.

The new service is expected to be less expensive than its current $9.99 per month price, with music industry sources claiming it will cost around $7.99.

Telegraph.co.uk

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