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Adrian Weckler: The smart forks and cookie jars that TELL you to slow down - the new weird and wacky gadgets

Smart forks that tell you to slow down, cookie jars that warn if you dip in too often and motorised roller skates: is this year's Consumer Electronics Show really the shape of things to come in our lives?

Or is it a bazaar of mad gadgets floating atop an inflated tech bubble?

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Lenovo Selfie Flash

Lenovo Selfie Flash

The Baby Glgl by Slow Control

The Baby Glgl by Slow Control

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An attendee holds Sony's new Walkman at the Sony booth at the International CES in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

An attendee holds Sony's new Walkman at the Sony booth at the International CES in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

AP

Executive VP of Samsung Electronics America Joe Stinziano unveils the new Samsung S'UHD smart TV at a Samsung Electronics news conference during the 2015 CES in Las Vegas. REUTERS/Steve Marcus

Executive VP of Samsung Electronics America Joe Stinziano unveils the new Samsung S'UHD smart TV at a Samsung Electronics news conference during the 2015 CES in Las Vegas. REUTERS/Steve Marcus

REUTERS

The LG G Flex 2 curved phone

The LG G Flex 2 curved phone

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Lenovo Selfie Flash

On the evidence of the first day at the world's biggest technology trade show, it is a little of both.

While major players in the global tech industry launched upgraded versions of TV, laptops, watches and smart home equipment, the event is plagued with me-too products and odd doodads.

Among the first wave of products picked for display to 150,000 tech industry visitors by conference organisers were a baby's bottle that tells parents when it is emptying, a cyclist's jacket that light up when you wave your arms and a Sleeptone 'pyjama' headband with speakers built in to lull you to sleep.

Apple, which is not displaying any new products here, may not be quaking in its boots.

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The Withings Activite Pop smart watch

The Withings Activite Pop smart watch

AP

The Withings Activite Pop smart watch

Even the serious global manufacturers launching new lines of established products are struggling to come up with the kind of 'wow' product that changes the face of technology.

LG's glitzy press conference yielded a curved phone, a few slimmer tellies, a washing machine and a fridge. Samsung's main event was a 105-inch TV that can bend and curve from your remote control.

Smartwatches are touted as one of the biggest new technologies to mature in 2015. But while there was a standout health watch launched by French company Withings (called the Activite Pop, and pictured inset), most of what is on offer here is a variation of the existing bland rubber fitness trackers that we all buy in January and give up on in February.

To be fair, the show has just begun. There will undoubtedly be interesting new products to emerge from it. Car manufacturers, for instance, are here in force: they are getting serious about making the vehicles we drive much more tech savvy.

But at the end of the show this Friday, there will be only one question for most ordinary people: which of this stuff will make any difference to our lives?

After day one, it's hard to answer that satisfactorily.

Irish Independent