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When it comes to pay rises, it's a man's world

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The stark facts are that more men than women got a pay rise last year - and more men expect a pay rise this year

The stark facts are that more men than women got a pay rise last year - and more men expect a pay rise this year

The stark facts are that more men than women got a pay rise last year - and more men expect a pay rise this year

HOPING for a pay rise this year? Well, don't get your hopes up too high if you are a woman, working outside Dublin, are over 40 and in a traditional job.

As far as the world of work and pay rises are concerned, it really helps if you are male, already in a high-paid job, and are a professional.

The stark facts are that more men than women got a pay rise last year - and more men expect a pay rise this year.

Younger workers and those based in Dublin are ahead of the rest in the race for a pay rise.

These are some of the conclusions from the Irish Independent/Today FM survey on pay expectations this year.

It is a man's world in the workplace.

That is certainly not as it should be and reflects the fact women are often perceived as child minders first and people who are holding down a job second.

This means they are behind their male counterparts when it comes to pay increases and promotion.

The survey chimes with data from the Central Statistics Office, which last year found women's hourly earnings were lower than those of their male counterparts. There is a tendency for women to predominate in sectors like catering, retail and other services industries where wage rates are already low.

'Zero-hour' contracts are not something many men have to contend with, but plenty of women will be only too familiar with this odious phenomenon.

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The controversial 'zero hours' practice obliges workers to be available at the employer's discretion, with no guarantee of a minimum number of paid hours per week.

The Irish Independent/Today FM survey also shows that older workers are the least optimistic about the prospects of a pay rise this year.

But it is no bad thing, because for the eight years of austerity here the perception has been that younger workers have been sacrificed, while the older ones have pulled up the ladder and kept most of the gains they got in the boom years.

Separate research from recruitment firm Morgan McKinley indicates that wage rises are a real possibility for those in high-tech sectors.

Engineers, digital media IT specialists, those in the life sciences and people in financial services can expect extra money in their salaries.

This just might encourage more emigrants to come home.

But they will be wary of an income tax system that takes so much from their wages.


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