Monday 22 July 2019

Parking space rule scrapped in bid to speed up delivery of city apartments

The plan aims to make it easier to refurbish existing buildings and carry out small scale works by removing certain restrictions. Stock Image
The plan aims to make it easier to refurbish existing buildings and carry out small scale works by removing certain restrictions. Stock Image

Niall O'Connor

Developers will no longer face the requirement to provide car parking spaces in city centre apartment blocks, as part of the Government's plan to tackle the housing crisis.

Measures are also being introduced which will simplify the planning process and allow more studio and one or two-bed apartments to be developed.

The plan aims to make it easier to refurbish existing buildings and carry out small scale works by removing certain restrictions.

There will also be a renewed emphasis on developing "shared living" options, which will be aimed at young workers.

The measures are part of new draft planning guidelines which are designed specifically to boost the provision of apartment accommodation in cities.

One of the new measures is to remove the parking space requirements currently in place in developments.

Housing Minister Eoghan Murphy last night warned that thousands of new apartments are needed in our cities and major urban areas to tackle both the housing crisis and to avoid urban sprawl.

The Fine Gael TD said updated draft guidelines on apartment developments are aimed at ensuring the right stock of homes is being built, in the right locations, and at a cost that is more economically attractive to investors.

"We know we have a housing shortage, but we are now beginning to catch things up.

"However, it is essential that as we build new homes, we don't repeat the mistakes of the past and create new crises for the future.

"We know we need to build more homes for individuals and couples, as well as more for renters, and we know this means building more apartments in our urban centres - but we also know that it has not been as economically attractive to do so," Mr Murphy said.

"It was clear to me upon taking office that we had a particular problem in this area. While there might be plenty of cranes across the skyline of Dublin for example, the vast majority are building offices, not homes. We need to turn this around."

Irish Independent

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