| 7.5°C Dublin

Full-time workers were paid €49,000 on average last year

Close

Payday: Earnings including overtime and irregular pay  have risen by 2.8pc from 2018 levels

Payday: Earnings including overtime and irregular pay have risen by 2.8pc from 2018 levels

Payday: Earnings including overtime and irregular pay have risen by 2.8pc from 2018 levels

AVERAGE pay for full-time workers nationwide reached a record high of nearly €49,000 last year, the CSO says.

Earnings including overtime and irregular pay rose by 2.8pc from 2018 and 9.2pc from 2014, according to the Central Statistics Office's analysis of 2019 pay and labour costs.

Overall, wages across the economy last year rose by 3.6pc - their fastest rate since the Celtic Tiger era - because of proportionately stronger growth in the modest salaries of part-time workers.

Part-timers saw their pay rise by 3.7pc last year to an average of €18,303. They were being paid less than €16,000 in 2014.

In a separate publication, the Revenue Commissioners has found that only 30pc of the State's PAYE workers make regular pension contributions through their employers' payrolls.

Its data - able to be compiled because of last year's introduction of real-time payroll reporting - found that those workers received €98.4bn in gross pay last year from which €36.2bn was deducted in tax and pension contributions. This included €16.7bn in income tax, €11.7bn in PRSI and €3.3bn in USC.

It found that 3.5pc of PAYE workers had 2019 gross earnings that topped €100,000.

Among all PAYE employees, about 30pc - around 775,000 people and mostly on above-average incomes - made regular monthly payments into pension schemes. Their 2019 payments totalled €2.5bn and were topped up by nearly €2bn from their employers.

Revenue noted that, regardless of their pay level, those employees who make pension payments typically commit only 3pc to 6pc of their pay.

All 13 employment sectors measured by the CSO experienced pay increases last year, led by information and communication roles. These received 5pc rises to €64,345, driven by high demand in IT and tech roles.

The most poorly paid sector - accommodation and food services - experienced average 4.9pc pay increases to €19,153. Most of those workers now are on unemployment or emergency Covid-19 payments, but many will return to State-subsidised payrolls as that sector starts to reopen.

The lowest average pay increase last year was for workers in public administration and defence. Their average pay rose last year by 1.3pc to €50,376 - still third highest among the 13 sectors.

Industrial workers worked the most paid overtime last year, averaging 1.6 hours a week. Transportation and construction workers came second with 1.2 hours, public administration with 1.1 hours. The CSO report offered no detail on unpaid overtime.

Irish Independent