| 14.9°C Dublin

Electricity supplier is forced to withdraw adverts

Close

Electricity and gas costs for domestic users here are among the highest in the EU, various studies have shown

Electricity and gas costs for domestic users here are among the highest in the EU, various studies have shown

Electricity and gas costs for domestic users here are among the highest in the EU, various studies have shown

An energy supplier has been forced to withdraw its adverts after the regulator accused it of "misleading" consumers.

PrePayPower, which has around 100,000 customers, claims to offer the cheapest electricity unit price. However, it is around €300 a year more expensive for a family than rival suppliers.

The firm has pulled its TV and radio advertising, which features heavily on Irish day-time TV, after the intervention of the regulator.

The company, which offers pay-as-you-go electricity through keypad meters, had been claiming that a price reduction meant it offered the cheapest unit rate for electricity.

But the Commission for Energy Regulation (CER) said this claim was "misleading" and called PrePayPower into its offices to explain the claims, after it was contacted about the issue by the 'Irish Independent'.

Misleading

A spokesman for the regulator said: "PrePayPower's claim appears to be misleading to customers because it omits some key tariff information. Such misleading information would be unacceptable to the CER."

The CER met PrePayPower yesterday and the company "agreed to take appropriate steps to help remedy the situation regarding their advertising campaign. In particular, it will withdraw its radio advert on the matter and review (amend or withdraw) its TV ad".

PrePayPower denies misleading customers. Energy expert Simon Moynihan, of Bonkers.ie, was one of the first to question PrePayPower's claims to offer the cheapest electricity unit rate. He said even after a cut in its unit rate of 7pc, from the end of this month, PrePayPower was one of the most expensive suppliers. "You can buy your electricity much cheaper from almost every other supplier."

Irish Independent