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DAB's failure to tune in poses 'what-ifs' for broadcasters

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Called 'Some Things Shouldn't be a Family Tradition', the campaign was created by the Dublin agency In the Company of Huskies. It highlights the harsh reality of poverty, including food poverty, at a time when many people willingly embrace over-indulgence

Called 'Some Things Shouldn't be a Family Tradition', the campaign was created by the Dublin agency In the Company of Huskies. It highlights the harsh reality of poverty, including food poverty, at a time when many people willingly embrace over-indulgence

Called 'Some Things Shouldn't be a Family Tradition', the campaign was created by the Dublin agency In the Company of Huskies. It highlights the harsh reality of poverty, including food poverty, at a time when many people willingly embrace over-indulgence

Somewhere at the bottom of a box in my bedroom wardrobe sits a clunky-looking digital audio broadcast (DAB) radio set that I bought back in the mid-to-late noughties. Still in its original box, it sits beside a Sony Walkman, a Motorola V3 Razr, an original iPod from 2003 and a hand-held Sony PSP console. This museum-in-a-box is a nod to a bygone era before everything went, well, digital.

The DAB radio was a stupid impulse purchase as it didn't even come with an FM tuner like most future models did. But I consoled myself by thinking it was only a matter of time before every radio station around the country would ditch FM and rush head-long into the warm embrace of DAB which, we were told at the time, was the future of radio broadcasting.


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