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Young men face double blow of high risk and lower paid roles

 

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A Deliveroo worker is seen in Dublin City Centre, during the outbreak of the coronavirus disease. Photo: REUTERS/Jason Cairnduff

A Deliveroo worker is seen in Dublin City Centre, during the outbreak of the coronavirus disease. Photo: REUTERS/Jason Cairnduff

REUTERS

A Deliveroo worker is seen in Dublin City Centre, during the outbreak of the coronavirus disease. Photo: REUTERS/Jason Cairnduff

As the country returns to work and lockdowns end, a new class of winners and losers looks set to emerge as some jobs are now inherently riskier due to the coronavirus.

While many in better paid professions have been able to keep their jobs or links to employers, younger and poorer workers have been hit hardest, statistics from the Central Statistics Office as well as the Department of Employment Affairs and Social Protection have already shown.

And an analysis of the figures by Central Bank of Ireland economist Reamonn Lydon forecasts that such differences in impact look set to continue as businesses begin to reopen.

"Analysing the occupational breakdown from the CSO highlights younger, male and non-Irish workers are more concentrated in 'high proximity roles'," he wrote in an online economics publication.

"High proximity roles" carry with them the risk of increased exposure to coronavirus, the Central Statistics Office (CSO) data showed and cover jobs such as paramedics, dental practitioners and physiotherapists.

By contrast, the CSO survey said that programmers and software development professionals make up the largest group in employment numbers who rated themselves as never being exposed to disease while at work.

The analysis by Mr Lydon shows that female workers are more likely to be in 'lower proximity jobs', with almost 60pc of them below the median score for all workers.

"It is hard to pinpoint a single occupation that contributes to this result for females, but a relatively higher concentration in occupations like chartered and certified accountants, cleaners and domestics and administrative occupations do stand out," Mr Lydon wrote.

By contrast, male, younger and non-Irish workers are all more likely to be in high-proximity jobs, with just 40pc below the median.

That higher male level of exposure comes from sports and leisure, skilled trades, construction and protective services, Mr Lydon's analysis revealed.

Many of the higher risk jobs are also less well paid.

In the top quarter of jobs classified by a high proximity score, the average of earnings per occupation is around €33,500.

The lowest risk quarter of jobs pay on average €42,300.

Irish Independent