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More staff want to work away from Dublin says EY as it creates 270 jobs

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Julie Fenton, fraud investigation & dispute partner, EY Ireland; Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation Mary Mitchell O’Connor; and Mike McKerr, country managing partner, EY Ireland; and Frank O’Keeffe, partner & head of assurance, EY Ireland, at yesterday’s announcement

Julie Fenton, fraud investigation & dispute partner, EY Ireland; Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation Mary Mitchell O’Connor; and Mike McKerr, country managing partner, EY Ireland; and Frank O’Keeffe, partner & head of assurance, EY Ireland, at yesterday’s announcement

Julie Fenton, fraud investigation & dispute partner, EY Ireland; Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation Mary Mitchell O’Connor; and Mike McKerr, country managing partner, EY Ireland; and Frank O’Keeffe, partner & head of assurance, EY Ireland, at yesterday’s announcement

Financial services firm EY Ireland is seeing a rise in the number of its staff opting to work outside of Dublin, which has added to the firm creating experienced roles outside of the capital.

The audit and tax company announced the creation of 270 roles across the island of Ireland, 85 of which will be based in regions excluding Dublin.

EY Ireland managing partner Mike McKerr told the Irish Independent that more workers are looking to be based closer to home.

"We're seeing increasing numbers of people who want to go back and live in the communities that they are attached to, so quite a few people are saying 'I actually do want to work in the west of Ireland' or' I do want to work in Munster'," he said.

He said the cost of living in Dublin was a contributing factor to the trend.

However, he said that workers who do move away from Dublin are not "compromising on the quality of work they get", which is a positive combination.

Mr McKerr was speaking in one of the company's two new offices in the Station Building on Harcourt Street in Dublin.

EY also announced the establishment of a second new office, based in Galway. However, the EY partner said the firm is already looking at more office space, having been limited by availability in Dublin.

"We've been looking for two years and frankly we were looking for a bigger footprint than we have here.

"We've been delighted to find this property, which will certainly hold us the next couple of years. It will meet our needs, but we are back in the market now to be perfectly honest, starting to think about a longer term solution," Mr McKerr said.

The company said high demand for services such as data analytics, fraud investigation, and disruption services is driving its Irish growth.

The new jobs, which will add to the company's total headcount of 1,800, are based across the areas of accounting, finance, engineering, IT, consultancy and business.

In addition to hiring 25 people for its new Galway office, EY will also expand in Limerick, where it currently employs over 50 people, having just signed the lease on a new office space in the city which can accommodate up to 100 people.

Jobs Minister Mary Mitchell O'Connor said EY's announcement was a "true mark of confidence in the Irish economy".

"The fact that these jobs will be spread across EY's offices in Dublin, Cork, Limerick, Waterford and Galway is very welcome news as one of my priorities as Minister is to ensure employment growth across the regions.

"Only a strong economy supporting people at work can pay for services needed to create a fair society," the minister said.

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