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Domino’s Pizza to add 350 jobs after soaring sales in lockdown

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Takeaway pizza company Domino’s has enjoyed significant financial success in the past year-plus. Photo: Craig Warga/Bloomberg

Takeaway pizza company Domino’s has enjoyed significant financial success in the past year-plus. Photo: Craig Warga/Bloomberg

Domino's Pizza is hiring managers, team members and contract drivers across Ireland. Photo: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg

Domino's Pizza is hiring managers, team members and contract drivers across Ireland. Photo: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg

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Takeaway pizza company Domino’s has enjoyed significant financial success in the past year-plus. Photo: Craig Warga/Bloomberg

Pizza maker Domino’s is to add 350 new jobs across Ireland after takeaway sales soared during lockdown.

The company is hiring managers, team members and contract drivers to boost its current staff of 2,000 across its 85 Irish stores.

“It has been a privilege to keep our stores open during Covid-19 and we’re delighted to be able to offer more people the opportunity to become a Domino’s team member,” said Scott Bush, Domino’s Pizza Group Ireland CEO.

“Creating 350 new roles will help ensure we keep serving our local communities safely as they do their jobs, often late into the night.”

Domino’s will provide training in customer service and food quality, as well as individual training for pizza chefs and other specific roles.

The business says safety will remain paramount, with contact-free delivery and in-store collection available across the country, while car collection is available in participating stores.

The news comes after a new study by think tank Social Justice Ireland found that unemployment could top 16pc after the pandemic ends.

It would be the highest rate of unemployment since the 1980s and higher than during the recession that followed the financial crisis.

According to the group’s latest Employment Monitor, one in five people do not expect to return to their jobs after the pandemic is over, with information and communication workers the most pessimistic about their future work prospects.

Colette Bennett, an economic and social analyst with Social Justice Ireland, said the country is facing “a major explosion of youth unemployment” after the pandemic.

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Dublin’s unemployment rate is set to surge to 21pc, an increase of almost 350pc on pre-pandemic levels. All other regions will likely double their pre-pandemic unemployment rates.

The border region will have the lowest unemployment rate but is also the region with highest poverty rate, the report found.

“While many employers are experiencing staff shortages, there will be a very large group wanting to work who will need upskilling and retraining to fill the vacant positions.” said Dr Seán Healy, CEO of Social Justice Ireland.

“It is essential that policy initiatives are taken immediately to address this situation,” Dr Healy added.


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