Wednesday 13 December 2017

Where are the current jobs?

A report from the Government's Research Prioritisation Group is a useful guide to future job creation, writes Tony Donohue

Tony Donohue

Q An estimated 68,280 ICT professionals work both within the ICT sector and across other sectors of the economy.

Q Ireland is likely to face an average increase in demand for high-level ICT skills of around 5pc a year out to 2018, with the employment of ICT professionals anticipated to rise to just over 91,000.

Q All of the top 10 technology companies have a presence in Ireland.

Q Over 5,300 tech companies in Ireland (multinational and indigenous) are responsible for 40pc of national exports.

AGRI FOOD

Q 230,000 jobs linked to agri-food.

Q Exports will exceed €9bn in 2013, two-thirds of these from Irish-owned companies.

Q Total payroll in the sector is €1.74bn – more than any other manufacturing sector.

Q €8bn worth of materials purchased – 75pc are sourced in Ireland.

Q €3.5bn worth of services purchased – almost half are sourced in Ireland.

Q Innovation is one of the three pillars (Smart, Green, Growth) of the national agri-food strategy Food Harvest 2020, which aims to create 30,000 new jobs.

PHARMACEUTICAL INDUSTRY

Q Nine of the top 10 multinationals in the world have substantial operations in Ireland.

Q Exported products worth €54bn in 2012, representing over 50pc of total national exports.

Q Contributes more than €1bn in corporation tax to the State annually.

Q Employs over 50,000 people directly and indirectly, 50pc of whom hold a third-level qualification, and the sector employs 25pc of all PhD researchers.

Q Replacement value of the sector is estimated at €40bn.

MEDICAL DEVICES

Q Employs 25,000 people, the highest number in any country in Europe per head of population.

Q Exports grew to €7.9bn in 2012, up 10pc since 2011.

Q 17 of the top 25 medical technology companies in the world have significant manufacturing and/or R&D facilities here.

Q 250 med tech companies located in Ireland – over half of which are indigenous.

WHERE ARE THE STEM JOBS OF THE FUTURE?

Two years ago, the Government asked the Research Prioritisation Group to identify a number of priority areas around which future investment in publicly-performed research should be based. This provides a useful map to where the STEM-related jobs of the future should be:

• Future networks and communications;

• Food for health;

• Sustainable food production and processing;

• Data analytics management, security and privacy;

• Digital platforms, content and applications;

• Marine renewable energy;

• Connected health and independent living;

• Smart grids and smart cities;

• Medical devices;

• Manufacturing competitiveness;

• Diagnostics;

• Processing technologies and novel materials;

• Therapeutics – synthesis formulation, processing and drug delivery;

• Innovation in services and business processes.

Irish Independent

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