Sunday 20 October 2019

Vodafone's internet-of-things connections up 35pc

Popularity: Adoption has grown in last year, says Debbie Power
Popularity: Adoption has grown in last year, says Debbie Power
Ellie Donnelly

Ellie Donnelly

Vodafone has seen the number of global connections for its internet-of-things (IoT) technology grow by 35pc year-on-year in Ireland.

IoT is the network of physical devices capable of talking to each other and interacting with the environment through the internet.

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Vodafone, the country's biggest mobile operator, is seeing steady growth in IoT technology as more and more applications connect using their global and local IoT networks.

Industries such as agriculture, health, transportation and logistics in particular are leading the charge. "Adoption of IoT technologies has grown significantly in the last year in Ireland," said Debbie Power, IoT manager at Vodafone Ireland.

"Organisations are now using IoT technology to create completely new services and transform their businesses. We are seeing adoption across a number of sectors, but some are consuming more readily than others. The most active industries include utilities, automotive, agriculture, logistics and healthcare."

According to a recent Vodafone survey, the rise in adoption of this technology is due to the ease with which organisations can buy cost-effective, off-the-shelf IoT solutions and bring them to life with reliable, secure connectivity.

IoT technology can have many uses, including connected ambulances, CCTV connectivity, GPS tracking, street lights and signage management. In the healthcare sector, Vodafone IoT is already enabling remote monitoring for people living with chronic conditions, helping remove their need to travel. The company sees agriculture as the sector with the most growth potential here.

It believes farmers and other agribusinesses can achieve higher yields, increase productivity and lower costs. Field sensors - or always-on IoT devices with a long battery life - connected by low-power narrowband-IoT tech can take into account crop conditions, temperatures and weather in order to adjust the way each crop or field is watered.

Irish Independent

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