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Shaping up: How Ireland's gym industry is going from strength to strength

With Irish people increasingly focused on their health and fitness a new range of gyms are using ever-more innovative strategies to tap a growing market

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'One leading player is FlyeFit, a network of gyms that lets people work out wherever they like for €31 a month. It has become the fastest-growing chain in the country with 60,000 members in total. Since starting in 2011, 14 premises have opened with another two planned this year.' Stock image

'One leading player is FlyeFit, a network of gyms that lets people work out wherever they like for €31 a month. It has become the fastest-growing chain in the country with 60,000 members in total. Since starting in 2011, 14 premises have opened with another two planned this year.' Stock image

'One leading player is FlyeFit, a network of gyms that lets people work out wherever they like for €31 a month. It has become the fastest-growing chain in the country with 60,000 members in total. Since starting in 2011, 14 premises have opened with another two planned this year.' Stock image

In the heart of Sandyford, south Dublin, sits a facility made of corrugated steel and concrete blocks decorated in bold colours. Inside is a community of people dedicated to exercise, something that has rapidly become almost a new religion.

When Raw Gyms opened in 2008 it was one of the first of its kind to cater to the demands of high-intensity niches such as body building. It has gone on to become one of the most recognisable brands in the country and will later this week open a two-storey underground facility with a twist in Donnybrook.

It is one of many businesses targeting a range of people with 'boutique' exercise propositions.


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