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Ryanair given green light for new Max simulator centre

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Talks: Ryanair CEO Michael O’Leary is in discussions with Boeing about a further Max order

Talks: Ryanair CEO Michael O’Leary is in discussions with Boeing about a further Max order

Talks: Ryanair CEO Michael O’Leary is in discussions with Boeing about a further Max order

RYANAIR has been given the go-ahead to build a multi-million-euro training centre near Dublin Airport that will include two simulators for the troubled Boeing 737 Max aircraft.

Planning permission for the technical centre of excellence comes almost exactly a year after the Max jets were grounded all over the world.

The facility is expected to cost tens of millions of euro when the price of the total of four full-motion simulators that will be installed there is included.

Apart from the two Max simulators, it will also house two full-motion Airbus A320 simulators. Airbus aircraft are used by Ryanair's Austria-based Lauda subsidiary.

Each new full-motion simulator can cost in the region of €14m.

The centre will also have two fixed-base simulators, as well as a full-motion simulator communications room, training rooms, an archive store, and other facilities.

One of the original selling points of the troubled Max jet was that pilots of Boeing's 737 NG aircraft would not need simulator training to fly the new model.

Following two fatal crashes - one in 2018 and the other in 2019 - Boeing now recommends that simulator training is undertaken by pilots intending to fly the Max.

The US Federal Aviation Administration is expected to make it mandatory.

Boeing is in talks with customers including Ryanair that would see the jet maker fund simulator training for the Max when it returns to service. The Max is not expected to be recertified to fly until mid-year in North America, and probably a couple of months later in Europe.

Ryanair has ordered up to 210 of the Max 200 variant.

Families of passengers killed on the Ethiopian Airlines Max jet that crashed outside Addis Ababa recently marked the first anniversary of the disaster. An interim report from Ethiopia's aircraft accident investigation unit this week blamed a flawed flight control system for the crash.

Irish Independent