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Irish company aims to scoot into the UK as it takes off in Germany

 

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Riding: Damian Young aims to bring his innovative Zeus e-scooters to Britain next

Riding: Damian Young aims to bring his innovative Zeus e-scooters to Britain next

A Zeus scooter

A Zeus scooter

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Riding: Damian Young aims to bring his innovative Zeus e-scooters to Britain next

An Irish electric scooter company, Zeus, plans to attack the UK market with its unique three-wheeled vehicles.

The Irish company was founded by a former banker, Damian Young, who launched Zeus Scooters in Heidelberg, Germany just three weeks ago.

According to Mr Young, Zeus already has agreements in place with six German cities to have its electric scooters available on the streets for public hire. The next German city where the scooters will be available is Ulm from July 27.

"Electric scooters are on the programme for government here in Ireland, yet electric scooters have still not been legislated for and are not a legal transport mode in Ireland yet," said Mr Young. "Now, with Eamon Ryan of the Greens holding the transport portfolio, we would certainly hope that the Irish government will see electric scooters as a sustainable, environmentally friendly transport solution and a means of easing traffic congestion in Irish cities."

Mr Young said that he hopes to have over 7,000 scooters on the roads or cycle paths of Europe by the end of 2021.

He said that the three wheels make the scooter "safer" and allow for a "smoother ride" for the user. The vehicle has a swappable battery and is capable of speeds of up to 20kmph. 

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A Zeus scooter

A Zeus scooter

A Zeus scooter

 

In Ireland, e-scooters are regarded as motorbikes and require a driver's licence, motor tax and insurance.

"The unique proposition that Zeus Scooters offer is that we are the only e-scooter in the world with three, instead of two wheels," said Mr Young.

"This means our scooters offer a more comfortable riding experience while also being much more stable.

"The third wheel means they don't tip over which makes them much safer and also means that when the user is finished with it, the scooter parks itself upright and it is not left lying on the ground," he added.

Mr Young sees potential for the service in 5,000 cities.

Irish Independent