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Generation Z and the fast-fashion paradox

Gen Z are feted as sustainability warriors, but data around real-world behaviour suggests that reputation is dangling by a very thin thread

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About 40pc of the 15 million used garments from Europe, North America, Australia, and the UK that flood every week into Ghana – one of the world’s biggest net importers of used garments – are deemed worthless and dumped. Photo: Stock Image/Depositphotos

About 40pc of the 15 million used garments from Europe, North America, Australia, and the UK that flood every week into Ghana – one of the world’s biggest net importers of used garments – are deemed worthless and dumped. Photo: Stock Image/Depositphotos

Shein advertising around Dublin

Shein advertising around Dublin

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About 40pc of the 15 million used garments from Europe, North America, Australia, and the UK that flood every week into Ghana – one of the world’s biggest net importers of used garments – are deemed worthless and dumped. Photo: Stock Image/Depositphotos

When Aoife McNamara began studying fashion at the Limerick School of Art & Design, she often shopped at Zara and other high-street retailers, unaware of the impact fast fashion can have on the environment and on garment workers.

But during her third year in college, her interest in sustainable fashion was piqued by The True Cost documentary and the Wardrobe Crisis podcast, which explored the environmental damage and labour violations inherent within the global textiles industry.


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