Wednesday 21 August 2019

Demand for Dublin eateries sparks 31 plans in 100m radius

restaurant

'In the 100-metre radius between George's Street South to where Richmond Street South meets the Grand Canal, there have been 31 applications over the past three years, according to Dublin City Council.' Stock image
'In the 100-metre radius between George's Street South to where Richmond Street South meets the Grand Canal, there have been 31 applications over the past three years, according to Dublin City Council.' Stock image

Michael Cogley

More than 30 restaurant planning permission applications have been lodged within a 100-metre radius in Dublin city centre, as demand for Irish food and coffee intensifies.

Bord Bia estimated that consumer spending in Ireland's 2,500 restaurants grew by 6.3pc to €229m last year. The booming Irish economy and increased spending have attracted big names to the capital, including London-based The Ivy and the Shelbourne Social.

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But providing restaurants and cafes in one particular part of town has proved to be very enticing for owners.

In the 100-metre radius between George's Street South to where Richmond Street South meets the Grand Canal, there have been 31 applications over the past three years, according to Dublin City Council.

The council said that 21 of them were for change of use, and a further 10 were for brand-new applications. One of the applications was refused and it is currently being appealed.

The area has seen the opening of numerous high-profile outlets, such as Mad Egg, Camden Bites and Brews, and Pickle.

Elsewhere in the city, the Dawson Street area has experienced significant inflows of investment, through the likes of the newly revamped Cafe en Seine. Owner the Mercantile Group is understood to have spent around €4m on the Dublin super-pub.

Speaking to the Sunday Independent, Dublin Town chief executive Richard Guiney had concerns around the proliferation of restaurants and cafes on the south side.

"Our view in terms of the restaurant trade is that we're probably at saturation point on the south side of the city," he said.

"We need to be more discerning in terms of the applications of more restaurant use. There is demand for high-quality outlets on the north side, and if people are interested in opening new venues, they should be encouraged to do so there."

Guiney also said that each new restaurant on the south side was likely to "take from others".

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