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DAA seeks deal for greater flexibility to use its staff between terminals


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DAA is seeking greater flexibility from trade unions at Dublin Airport. (Stock image)

DAA is seeking greater flexibility from trade unions at Dublin Airport. (Stock image)

DAA is seeking greater flexibility from trade unions at Dublin Airport. (Stock image)

DAA is seeking greater flexibility from trade unions at Dublin Airport to allow it move different categories of staff between Terminal 1 and Terminal 2.

The move could further erode original plans to run the two terminals separately and see an even greater number of lower-paid workers operating in Terminal 1 alongside DAA staff on better legacy wages, according to sources.

The issue is one of a number of points under discussion at ongoing industrial relations talks between DAA and Siptu.

When DAA completed the €600m second terminal in 2010 the Government insisted on a competitive tender process to appoint an independent operator. It subsequently awarded the contract to DAA, but a whole new set of less lucrative work practices and employment terms and conditions - with wage rates at least 30pc lower than in Terminal 1 - were agreed with unions.

Siptu said last week in a memo to its members at the airport that industrial relations talks had been "open and productive" and that a very tight deadline had been established.

Agreement was being sought by the company on the "circumstances for some cross over of staff between Terminal 1 & 2 and clarification of the process for introducing new categories of staff", said the union. The two sides are also discussing absentee rates, an improvement in the sick pay scheme for Terminal 2 workers and an increase in full-time contracts.

The negotiations come against the backdrop of an Oxford Economics report brought to cabinet by transport minister Shane Ross which said an independently-run third terminal at Dublin Airport would be feasible.

The report itself noted that such an arrangement could be a "substantial risk" and airlines - and the DAA itself - have insisted no new terminal is needed. They argue that other infrastructure needs - such as a planned new runway and new parking stands - are currently the priority.

DAA has started formal consultations on a €900m capital investment programme for Dublin Airport, which it says will help the airport grow to 40 million passengers a year.

It is proposing to invest about €400m between 2020 and 2024 to deliver new capacity in the northern end of the airport close to Terminal 1, while about €500m will be invested at the southern apron area close to Terminal 2.

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