Thursday 22 August 2019

Concern over failure to boost number of women in top Irish business roles

 

The dean of Cork University Business School, Professor Thia Hennessy, expressed a
The dean of Cork University Business School, Professor Thia Hennessy, expressed a "great concern" about the under-representation of women in senior business roles (stock photo)

Fearghal O'Connor

The percentage of women in senior organisational roles in Irish business is still below what it should be, according to the head of one of the country's biggest business schools.

The dean of Cork University Business School, Professor Thia Hennessy, expressed a "great concern" about the under-representation of women in senior business roles.

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"Society needs more women in top roles," said Hennessy at the launch of a new scholarship backed by business organisation the 30% Club, which is pushing to have 30pc women on boards and in executive management by 2020.

As the new scholarship was launched with the goal of achieving better gender balance at all levels in Irish business, female representation on company boards in Ireland is at 16pc.

"The under-representation of women in senior business roles is a great concern for all in society and is something about which I am personally very concerned. I am a great admirer of the work of the 30% Club and so I am especially delighted to launch this scholarship and give the opportunity to an aspiring female business leader to fulfil her potential through our MSc in Project Management," said Hennessy.

Research shows when there are fewer females on company boards, the gender pay gap in organisations was much greater, by up to 50pc, according to Professor Carol Kulik of the University of South Australia, who spoke at the business school.

The new scholarship - aimed at helping to promote women in senior project management and leadership roles within companies and organisations - has been established by UCC's Department of Management and Marketing.

It is supported by the 30% Club, a business organisation backed by 200 Irish companies that is aimed at accelerating gender balance in these organisations through their own voluntary actions.

"We are delighted to partner with UCC which joins a number of universities and business schools across Ireland to rectify the under-representation of women pursuing post-graduate management education by offering scholarships for women," said Carol Andrews, chairwoman of 30% Club Ireland.

"Through these partnerships, we seek to build a continuum of change, highlighting the impact of executive education in accelerating career development and helping women to decide to undertake further education."

The course is designed to prepare its participants with a broad perspective of project and programme management and equip graduates with ethical managerial and business skills.

The new scholarship is open to all female applicants who have accepted a place on the MSc Project Management at the college.

Sunday Indo Business

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