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Boots Ireland in legal dispute after they stopped paying rent on some shops

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Profit: Boots high street store

Profit: Boots high street store

Profit: Boots high street store

Boots Ireland has stopped paying rent on some of its shops in Ireland.

The company is now in a legal dispute with MNK Investments, the owner of the Omni Shopping Centre in Santry.

In addition, the UK-listed company is facing a law suit from Balrath Investments over rent at the Charlestown Shopping Centre in Finglas.

The story was first reported in the Irish Times.

A spokesperson for the pharmacy chain said that since March it has remained committed to keeping stores open.

“This is despite the fact that the Covid-19 pandemic had a negative impact on our business.”

Boots Ireland said it has contacted “a number” of its larger commercial landlords to discuss options for rental and service charge payments in light of the Covid-19 pandemic and its impact on the business.

“At this time we paused some payments whilst discussions were ongoing. We wish to work together with our landlords to reach fair agreements that support Boots as one of Ireland's essential businesses at this time,” the spokesperson said.

“This will help ensure a long-term and healthy future for the business allowing Boots to continue its role in providing vital pharmacy and healthcare services to communities across Ireland.”

The Irish arm of pharmaceutical chain Boots saw an 11pc rise in its operating profit last year to €26.5m thanks to the opening of new stores and strong pharmacy sales.

Revenues rose 3.5pc to €339.6m in the 12 months to August 31, according to accounts for the company.

However, as the results are for the 12 months to August 31 last year, it does not cover the period since Covid-19 first arrived in Ireland.

MNK earlier this year also initiative legal action against Tesco which has yet to proceed.

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