Business Irish

Monday 23 July 2018

Almost one in four living in Irish cities at risk of poverty or social exclusion in 2016

(Stock photo)
(Stock photo)
Ellie Donnelly

Ellie Donnelly

Just under one in four people living in Irish cities were at risk of poverty or social exclusion in 2016.

While in towns and suburbs around Ireland approximately 27pc of people were under such risk, according to new data from Eurostat, the statistical office of the European Union.

To be 'at risk of poverty or social exclusion', one of the following three situations must apply: the person must be at risk of monetary poverty, severely materially deprived, and/or living in a household with very low work intensity.

The figure for Irish people at risk of poverty and social exclusion in towns and suburbs around Ireland was higher than the EU average of 22pc.

Moving to rural areas and the figure for those at risk of poverty or social exclusion in 2016 was around 22pc.

Overall in 2016 almost one in four city dwellers (23.6pc) in the EU was at risk of poverty or social exclusion.

However, this rate was lower than the 25.5pc of the population at risk of poverty or social exclusion who lived in rural areas, but higher than the EU average of 21.6pc of population in towns and suburbs.

The total share of the population who were at risk of poverty or social exclusion in the EU has slightly increased over the years.

The lowest share of city dwellers at risk of poverty or social exclusion was recorded in Slovakia, which was closely followed by Czech Republic and ahead of Poland.

At the other end of the scale, the highest share was observed in the cities of Greece, followed by Bulgaria and Italy.

The Eurostat statistics also show a marked geographical split; on the one hand, the highest risk of poverty or social exclusion in most of the western and northern Member States was usually recorded for people living in cities.

However, the highest risk of poverty or social exclusion for many of the eastern, southern and Baltic Member States was usually recorded in rural populations.

Ireland, the Czech Republic, Finland, Italy, and Slovenia recorded a fairly uniform distribution across city, urban, and rural areas.

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