Business In The Workplace

Wednesday 23 May 2018

Over third of working Irish women considered leaving or left due to lack of equal opportunities - expert research

New research commissioned by the Irish office of Duff & Phelps found that over a third of women in Ireland’s professional workforce (39 percent) have considered leaving or left their positions due to the lack of equal opportunities, compared to their male colleagues.
Pictured: Anne O’Dwyer, Managing Director at the Irish office of Duff & Phelps.
New research commissioned by the Irish office of Duff & Phelps found that over a third of women in Ireland’s professional workforce (39 percent) have considered leaving or left their positions due to the lack of equal opportunities, compared to their male colleagues. Pictured: Anne O’Dwyer, Managing Director at the Irish office of Duff & Phelps.
Louise Kelly

Louise Kelly

Over one third of women in the Irish workforce have considered leaving or left their professional positions due to opportunity inequalities in their company, according to new research.

The study from Duff & Phelps' Irish office revealed that 39pc of female employees responded in this way as they felt that there was a lack of equal opportunities in comparison with their male colleagues

While the majority of respondents (87pc) said that they believed there has been an improvement in this area in recent years, some two thirds still feel their industry does not have a satisfactory gender equality split.

Managing Director of Duff & Phelps Ireland Anne O’Dwyer said that while the results of the research were "encouraging", demonstrating that Ireland has made "big strides" over the last five years, there is still a lot more to be done.

"Key to the success of any business is attraction and retention of quality people, and Ireland needs equal opportunities for both genders to ensure we have a diverse workforce that can deliver the best results," she said.

"The importance of International Women’s Day is clear, but the research really shows that both business and Government must take sustained action to continue to improve gender equality."

Carried out ahead of IWD 2018, some 110 senior level female respondents working across various disciplines in Ireland took part in the survey.

In their opinion, Ireland ranks as average for equality (75pc) as a mere 11pc believing that Ireland ranked strongly in terms of equal opportunities for women. 

Furthermore, almost half of those who took part (48pc) think that the Government should improve shared parental leave options, and that it should also tackle the areas of incentivising flextime/remote working (77pc) and publishing legislation to force organisations to disclose their gender pay gaps (54pc).

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