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Indeed tells 1,000 Irish staff: you can now work from home for good

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Outbreak: Indeed’s offices on St Stephen’s Green in Dublin. The firm was one of the first to send its staff home. Photo: Google Streetview

Outbreak: Indeed’s offices on St Stephen’s Green in Dublin. The firm was one of the first to send its staff home. Photo: Google Streetview

Outbreak: Indeed’s offices on St Stephen’s Green in Dublin. The firm was one of the first to send its staff home. Photo: Google Streetview

The recruitment company Indeed has informed more than 1,000 Irish staff that the majority will be allowed work from home indefinitely, either partly or fully.

The job site was one of the first major employers in Ireland to send people home due to the Covid outbreak in February.

With two Dublin-based offices, the company said that it will allow "the vast majority" of its staff to work in either a "hybrid" or "remote" format.

"Employees will be notified of which category their role is in, and will choose how they want to work," the company said in a statement. "The vast majority of employees will qualify for hybrid work or fully remote, and all of Indeed remains remote until July 2021."

A 'hybrid' model entails some time in the office and some at home. 'Fully remote' means working entirely from home. However, a spokesperson for Indeed declined to confirm that a majority of its staff would be allowed to avail of the 'fully remote' option, only stating that the "vast majority" could avail of one of the two working options.

The spokesperson also said that remote working does not allow staff to leave the country or relocate to adjacent jurisdictions such as Northern Ireland.

"Indeed previously announced that no employee will be required to return to the office before July 2021," the company statement said. "However there are no plans to switch permanently to an entirely remote workforce and offices will reopen when it is safe to do so. Indeed plans to prioritise certain employees when returning to the office. For example, those who have expressed a high degree of eagerness to come back to the office and have indicated hardship factors with working from home."

Irish-based tech multinational companies were among the first large organisations to operate a mass home-working policy. However, Dublin's largest tech employers, Google and Facebook, both say that they plan to keep their physical office portfolio here and do not intend to move to a majority remote-working system.

Last week, a report from the stockbroking firm Davy suggested that thousands of Google Dublin workers had relocated to other countries during the Covid lockdown. Sources within Google said the report was inaccurate, citing their employment rules that generally disallow long term remote working from outside the country.

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