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From Taiwan to Finland - who's here and why

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A view from the Brand X Roundtable discussion at the Four Seasons Hotel, Ballsbridge. Pic: Nick Bradshaw / Sportsfile.

A view from the Brand X Roundtable discussion at the Four Seasons Hotel, Ballsbridge. Pic: Nick Bradshaw / Sportsfile.

SPORTSFILE

Henry Blodget, co-founder and CEO, Business Insider, and Jim Bankoff, CEO and chairman, Vox Media, discuss The Future of Media with David Carr, journalist and author, The New York Times.

Henry Blodget, co-founder and CEO, Business Insider, and Jim Bankoff, CEO and chairman, Vox Media, discuss The Future of Media with David Carr, journalist and author, The New York Times.

SPORTSFILE

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A view from the Brand X Roundtable discussion at the Four Seasons Hotel, Ballsbridge. Pic: Nick Bradshaw / Sportsfile.

One of the biggest testaments to Web Summit's success is that only a fraction of the start-ups in attendance are Irish; the majority come from overseas. Walk around the Summit's central 'Village' area and you'll hear a cacophony of different languages. Here are six companies from interesting destinations who made the trek to Ireland this week.

Me2We (Finland)

Me2We unites universities with companies. It provides an online platform where universities can advertise their courses and seek corporate partners, while companies can access promising students. Its small group of Scandinavian founders are constantly on the go; they have just completed a month-long road trip around Europe making connections, while chairman Petri Tuomela had to duck out of Web Summit at one point to pitch for a Finnish start-up competition via Skype.

Pixxers (Austria)

Pixxers runs a stock photography service with a difference. Users "wish" for images and other users answers that wish with their own snaps. The service is free unless you are a corporation, in which case you pay if you want to use a photo. It is open to everyone from the most amateur smartphone snapper to professional photographers.

Amicimi (Belgium)

Amicimi is a personal safety device linked to the internet. It includes a discreet panic-button unit and smartphone app that alerts emergency services to respond to your exact location. When you squeeze your Amicimi it also instructs your smartphone to automatically start recording audio as a way to gather evidence of any crime in process. It works globally and in the user's language, regardless of their emergency location. It is being launched in the US and UK next year.

Imonology (Taiwan)

Shun-Yun Hu and his team are all about virtual reality. Their product ImonCloud allows game developers to create and maintain multiplayer environments and multi-user functionality for all kinds of games and apps. This has much wider potential, he says. Imonology see virtual reality technology developing to the extent that an event the size of Web Summit could be held entirely online.

Heppee (The Netherlands)

Heppee's app is designed for children whose parents are divorced. These kids often have a difficult schedule, regularly moving between two parents and posing both logistical and emotional challenges. The app tells the child when they will be moving from parent to parent, gauges their feelings with a mood button and allows parents to share information.

Fanmode (UK)

Fanmode's app is targeted at sports fans who watch matches at home on a screen. It allows them to be part of the action and contribute their feelings, as they would by roaring approval or derision if they were sitting in the stands. It is gesture-based; fans swipe up to cheer and down to boo. The aim is that fans around the world feel more connected and the sports industry has more accurate information about consumer sentiment.

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