Farm Ireland
Independent.ie

Wednesday 22 November 2017

'Farmers who don’t bargain paying €30/t more for fertiliser'

Mark Corrigan from Tullow, Co Carlow on work placement from Kildalton College after spreading ADM fertiliser on winter barley for Hugh McDonald at Bagenalstown, Co Carlow PHOTO: ROGER JONES
Mark Corrigan from Tullow, Co Carlow on work placement from Kildalton College after spreading ADM fertiliser on winter barley for Hugh McDonald at Bagenalstown, Co Carlow PHOTO: ROGER JONES
Ciaran Moran

Ciaran Moran

Fertiliser traders have been called on to immediately pass through the significant drop in wholesale fertiliser prices to farmers, by IFA Inputs Project Team Leader John Coughlan.

He said International wholesale CAN prices have fallen by €30 to €35/t over recent weeks.

“However, many farmers are not seeing this as importers and many of the larger merchants attempt to maintain prices at artificially inflated levels in an effort to boost profit margins.

“Demand for fertiliser has increased significantly as the silage season gets into full swing. Keenest quotes for bagged CAN this week are ranging from €215/t to €218/t delivered.

“Pasture Sward / 27-2.5-5 and Cut Sward / 24-2.5-10 prices have also moved lower with keenest quotes at €318/t for Pasture and €8/t - €10/t over for Cuts.

“Buyer groups and individuals purchasing significant volumes are achieving further discounts on these prices,” he said.

Coughlan warned that no farmer should order a load of fertiliser without first enquiring about the price.

“It is evident from recent survey results that some farmers are being charged up to €30/t extra where they don’t bargain for a price before placing the order,” he said.

Also Read


MEPs have clashed over draft EU fertiliser rules that some fear could push up costs for farmers and leave the bloc dependent on Russian imports.

During a debate in the European Parliament's agriculture committee last week, battle lines were drawn on a year-old European Commission proposal intended to boost organic fertilisers.

Only 10pc of fertilisers in the EU are organic (based on compost or manure), with 80pc produced using minerals, mainly nitrogen, but also phosphorus and potassium.

Agriculture MEPs are afraid that a rule change designed to reduce cadmium, a naturally occurring but toxic and carcinogenic heavy metal, in phosphate rock imports will benefit Russia.

The EU imports around six million tonnes of phosphate a year, mainly from Morocco, where naturally occurring cadmium residues are high.

The Commission wants to lower cadmium limits gradually from 60mg/kg of phosphate to 20mg/kg over a period of 12 years.

"The only country that can produce cadmium respecting these limits is Russia," said Romanian centre-right MEP Daniel Buda during a debate on the draft last week.


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