Farm Ireland
Independent.ie

Thursday 15 November 2018

Puppies cannot be bought unless their mother is present under new UK laws

The new legislation will require all sellers to show potential buyers the puppies alongside their mothers before the sale takes place. Stock image.
The new legislation will require all sellers to show potential buyers the puppies alongside their mothers before the sale takes place. Stock image.

Steven Swinford

The sale of puppies without their mother present will be banned in a bid to end the “disturbing” trade of animals bred in puppy farms, Theresa May has announced.

The Prime Minister, who had two dogs during her childhood - a poodle named Tassel and a mongrel called Lucky -  said she wants to ensure that families can enjoy the arrival of a “happy, healthy” puppy that has not suffered from maltreatment and cruelty.

The new legislation will require all sellers to show potential buyers the puppies alongside their mothers before the sale takes place, marking the biggest change in pet vending for 66 years.

The move is designed to stop people buying puppies online without ever seeing them, which is fuelling animal cruelty.

Licensed dog breeders will also be banned from selling puppies they have not bred themselves and online adverts will have to include the seller’s licence number, the country of origin and country of residence of the pet being advertised.

Online websites

Leading animal welfare organisations in Ireland have called on the public to do their homework before getting pets via online websites.

The Irish Pet Advertising Advisory Group (IPAAG) is reminding potential buyers to beware of the pitfalls of responding to online advertisements for puppies and other pets to ensure that they ask the right questions to avoid falling victim to rogue breeders, who put profits before animal welfare.

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In 2015, leading animal welfare organisations (ISPCA, Dogs Trust, IHWT, Donkey Sanctuary, Irish Blue Cross and MADRA) along with representatives from the veterinary profession and websites advertising pets for sale joined forces to develop a set of minimum standards for websites to help protect the welfare of animals that are advertised online and ensure that any illegal activity is identified and investigated.

IPAAG has been targeting unscrupulous breeders by reporting inappropriate online adverts in breach of the IPAAG minimum standards where they were acting illegally and compromising the welfare of innocent animals to make a quick profit.


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