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Tuesday 23 January 2018

Rare BSE found by German authorities

Brainparts, extracted from cowheads are tested at the German Eurofins Scientific BSE-Test GmbH in Garching near Munich, November 22, 2000. EU farm ministers agreed at a meeting in Brussels to extend cattle testing to all cattle at risk aged over 30 months. This could be expanded to all cattle destined for the food chain over that age. BSE can cause the deadly Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease in humans via the food chain. REUTERS/Michael Dalder
Brainparts, extracted from cowheads are tested at the German Eurofins Scientific BSE-Test GmbH in Garching near Munich, November 22, 2000. EU farm ministers agreed at a meeting in Brussels to extend cattle testing to all cattle at risk aged over 30 months. This could be expanded to all cattle destined for the food chain over that age. BSE can cause the deadly Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease in humans via the food chain. REUTERS/Michael Dalder
Caitriona Murphy

Caitriona Murphy

German authorities confirmed the discovery of BSE in a 10-year-old cow presented for slaughter last week.

The cow was confirmed to be suffering from a rare form of BSE (typical L-type BSE) that is not generally associated with an animal consuming infected feed.

The cow's carcase was destroyed and an investigation opened into the farm and the cow's seven offspring. Five of her offspring had already been slaughtered and the remaining two, which were still on the farm of origin, were killed and the carcases destroyed.

Five more animals born on the farm around the same time as the infected cow were also killed and destroyed by officials as a precaution.

The news will be viewed as a worrying development by authorities across Europe, given that the reopening of markets in the Far East and Middle East for European beef has been based on a steady decrease in the incidence of BSE.

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