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Too many Green gains could spark an all-out rebellion in FG and FF

John Downing



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Taoiseach Leo Varadkar adressing media at a Government Covid-19 Press Briefing at Government Buildings.
Pic Steve Humphreys
24th March 2020

Taoiseach Leo Varadkar adressing media at a Government Covid-19 Press Briefing at Government Buildings. Pic Steve Humphreys 24th March 2020

Balancing act: Green Party leader Eamon Ryan during a press briefing on the plinth of Leinster House yesterday. Photo: Gareth Chaney/Collins

Balancing act: Green Party leader Eamon Ryan during a press briefing on the plinth of Leinster House yesterday. Photo: Gareth Chaney/Collins

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Taoiseach Leo Varadkar adressing media at a Government Covid-19 Press Briefing at Government Buildings. Pic Steve Humphreys 24th March 2020

The squeaky wheel more usually gets the grease. It's an unlovely political metaphor and the Green Party politicians and activists will not be happy at being described as "squeaky".

It's just a way of saying that their political dilemmas and sensitivities have commanded much attention for the past week. The result is that we risk forgetting the other parties in this triangle - Fine Gael and Fianna Fáil - which have their own base of loyal supporters to keep on board.

"The dilemma we face is to satisfy the Greens' demands on all their core issues, especially climate change, while also not alienating our own rural support base," one person close to the drawn-out coalition process told the Irish Independent.