Farm Ireland
Independent.ie

Friday 20 July 2018

Department to establish prevalence in Ireland of disease which will see 120,000 cows culled in New Zealand

New Zealand, the world’s biggest dairy exporter, will spend more than NZ$880 million (€522 million) in a bid to eradicate the mycoplasma bovis cattle disease.
New Zealand, the world’s biggest dairy exporter, will spend more than NZ$880 million (€522 million) in a bid to eradicate the mycoplasma bovis cattle disease.
Ciaran Moran

Ciaran Moran

The Department of Agriculture is planning to undertake a study to establish the prevalence of M. bovis infection in the national herd.

Mycoplasma bovis (M. bovis) infection is most commonly associated with respiratory disease and arthritis in juvenile cattle and feedlot beef cattle and with mastitis in dairy cows.

The Minister for Agriculture, Michael Creed said his Department’s Veterinary Laboratories have been involved in investigating a number of disease incidents in recent years - in which adult dairy cows have developed arthritis and this has been attributed to M. bovis infection.

He said that the Laboratories will continue to work closely with herd-owners and attending veterinary practitioners in investigating affected herds to try and gain a better understanding of this disease process and to advise the farming community and veterinary practitioners, accordingly.

The Minister also indicated that the Department is also planning to study to establish the prevalence of the disease in Ireland.

New Zealand, the world’s biggest dairy exporter, will spend more than NZ$880 million (€522 million) in a bid to eradicate the mycoplasma bovis cattle disease.

About 126,000 cows are expected to be culled, mainly over the next two years, as government and industry work to depopulate all infected farms, the government said in a statement.

The disease, which is common in many countries, was first detected in New Zealand at a farm in the South Island last July and some 37 properties have now tested positive for the illness.

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