Mercury rises to 28C: We're 'sitting on the edge of a hotplate' as Ireland bakes

  • Met Eireann issues heat warning for six counties
  • Very hot weather is not expected to last into next week
Éoin ÓSé, farmer in Ventry, Dingle Peninsula, turning, with his trusted 1962 Massy Ferguson, as June temperatures improve for farmers.Photo:Valerie OSullivan/Date 21/06/2019
Éoin ÓSé, farmer in Ventry, Dingle Peninsula, turning, with his trusted 1962 Massy Ferguson, as June temperatures improve for farmers.Photo:Valerie OSullivan/Date 21/06/2019
Having fun at Portmarnock Beach was Ruth Daly (8) from Raheny (right) with visiting friends Ainara Garcia (11) and Georgina Rodriguez (12) (centre) both from Seville Spain. Pic Steve Humphreys 26th June 2019
Splashing around: Competitors take part in the O’Leary Life Sovereign’s Cup 2019 organised by Kinsale Yacht Club. Photo: David Branigan/Oceansport

Allison Bray, Gabija Gataveckaite and Anne Lucey

Ireland will be "sitting on the edge of a hotplate" today as the effects of a Europe-wide heatwave that has already claimed several lives pushes the mercury here to a sizzling 28C.

Met Éireann has issued a Status Yellow heat warning for six counties today as temperatures are expected to exceed 27C in counties Galway, Mayo, Clare, Cork, Kerry and Limerick by this afternoon.

The warning for vulnerable people to take precautions against excessive heat is valid from 1pm to 7pm tonight.

“It will reach those temperatures of 27, 28 in those counties along the west coast, generally were looking at 22, 24, 25, 26 degrees nationwide, maybe a few degrees lower in the east coast,” said Met Eireann forecaster Dr Clara Finkele on RTÉ’s Radio One this morning.

Crop & Spreading demonstrations were held in Oak Park carlow in photo are the spreaders line up to demonstrate the workings of each spreader. Photo Roger Jones.
Crop & Spreading demonstrations were held in Oak Park carlow in photo are the spreaders line up to demonstrate the workings of each spreader. Photo Roger Jones.
Fun in the sun: Mary Jane Emmett, Ciara Drumgoole and Mary McKee in St Stephen’s Green, Dublin. Photo: Steve Humphreys

“Early next week, the temperatures will return to more normal temperatures in high teens, low 20s, mainly 21, 22, degrees by midweek next week.”

However, Pride parade goers are set for a treat on Saturday as temperatures will reach 25 degrees in some parts of the country.

“Saturday is still a warm day, 20 to 25 degrees but then the winds will turn westerly for Sunday and it will be actually quite breezy,” added Dr Finkele.

“And then, temperatures will return to 17 to 20 degrees,” she said.

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The Europe-wide heatwave has already claimed several lives, with mercury soaring to over 40 degrees in some countries.

“We’re having some of this very hot airflow from the continent coming across to us,” Dr Finkele explained.

Collecting silage in Co Carlow. Photo: Roger Jones
Collecting silage in Co Carlow. Photo: Roger Jones

“We’re having quite pleasant temperatures but the continent is experiencing extreme high temperatures.”

Temperatures in excess of 27 degrees are expected to hit  western counties tomorrow.

It comes as Clare County Council also issued a warning for both landowners and the public at large to refrain from outdoor burning to prevent the spread of wildfires.

Clare County Fire and Rescue Service warned that "any outside burning can spread to private and State-owned forestry plantations and jeopardise the safety of dwellings and families living in rural areas".

"We would like to remind landowners that it is an offence under the Wildlife Act to burn growing vegetation between March 1 and August 31 in any year, on any land not then cultivated. The sad fact is that if this simple rule was adhered to, many costly and dangerous wildfires that occur across Clare each year would be avoided," said Adrian Kelly, Clare County Council chief fire officer.

Meanwhile, gardaí are investigating the burning of a giant teddy built out of haybales which is used each year to direct children in north Kerry to an enchanted fairy festival.

Ted, made up of 15 bales of hay and almost three metres high, is the mascot for the annual Kilflynn Enchanted Fairy Festival. He is erected each year at the crossroads to the village off the main Tralee to Listowel Road and several hours' work and many hands go into his making. But on Tuesday at around 5.30am gardaí were alerted that Ted, who had been built the previous day, was on fire. He has been rebuilt and gardaí said their investigation was continuing.

Irish Independent


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