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Sunday 19 November 2017

'You'll get better value from your forestry crop if you thin it right'

Mark McAuley, IBEC; Trevor McHugh, Irish Forestry Forest Products Association; Gerry Boyle, Director of Teagasc; Marianne Lyons, Forest Teacher, Ballyhaise Agricultural College; Tom Houlihan, Teagasc Forestry Specialist; Kevin O'Connell, Forest Tutor & Advisor, Ballyhaise Agricultural College and John Kelly, Principal Ballyhaise Agricultural College at the Teagasc
Mark McAuley, IBEC; Trevor McHugh, Irish Forestry Forest Products Association; Gerry Boyle, Director of Teagasc; Marianne Lyons, Forest Teacher, Ballyhaise Agricultural College; Tom Houlihan, Teagasc Forestry Specialist; Kevin O'Connell, Forest Tutor & Advisor, Ballyhaise Agricultural College and John Kelly, Principal Ballyhaise Agricultural College at the Teagasc "Talking Timber" conference at Ballyhaise Agricultural College.

Crooked reject logs do not make the grade when it comes to processing and care needs to be taken at the thinning stage so forest owners can yield the most from their crop, according to a leading timber expert.

John Ryan of Murray Timber Group told the Talking Timber audience that good-quality logs with no defects yield the best price for forest owners. "We pay €75/ton for a 4.9m log of 16cm diameter with no knots or side branches. Reject logs are not acceptable. If thinned right, you'll get more value from your crop," he said.

He advised that it's important to build roadways and have easy access to your forest in order to attract timber companies to buy your crop: "I like to see a history of timber movement and roadways or paths when I visit a site. You need to have access if you're going down the thinning route."

Trevor McHugh of the Irish Forestry and Forest Products Association told the Farming Independent that it's important for forestry owners to see with their own eyes what quality is expected of them when approaching timber companies.

"It helps farmers in their first rotation of forestry visually identify what is expected of them from timber companies," he said. "It's great to hear from sawmills want they want and to see forest owners engaging."

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