Farming

| 6.8°C Dublin

Farming

Close

Premium

If we only plant native trees, we could end up with no woods at all

Joe Barry explains why planting a mix of conifer and broadleaf, native and non-native, is best for the environment, for wildlife and for foresters — as new pests and diseases threaten indigenous species

Close

Changing landscape: Joe Barry with the dying ash trees in his forest in Kilcock, Co Kildare

Changing landscape: Joe Barry with the dying ash trees in his forest in Kilcock, Co Kildare

Valuable: Don’t underestimate the usefulness of conifers, both commercially and environmentally, says Joe Barry

Valuable: Don’t underestimate the usefulness of conifers, both commercially and environmentally, says Joe Barry

'Growing conifers is commercially viable. Growing broadleaves is not'

'Growing conifers is commercially viable. Growing broadleaves is not'

/

Changing landscape: Joe Barry with the dying ash trees in his forest in Kilcock, Co Kildare

The arrival of Chalara fraxinea (Ash dieback) meant that much of the 70ac of ash we had planted 25 years ago has to be replaced.

We have to start all over again, aware that no species can be assumed to be safe. Climate change has brought a host of new pests and diseases that we have little chance of avoiding.


Most Watched





Privacy