Farm Ireland
Independent.ie

Thursday 21 June 2018

Flooding adds to farmers fodder pressures as rainfall 300pc above normal levels in places

South Galway experienced heavy flooding over the weekend, adding to the fodder pressures already being experienced by farmers in the are and other parts of the west and north-west. PHOTO: Hany Marzouk
South Galway experienced heavy flooding over the weekend, adding to the fodder pressures already being experienced by farmers in the are and other parts of the west and north-west. PHOTO: Hany Marzouk
Claire Fox

Claire Fox

The picture above shows some of the heavy flooding which hit South Galway last weekend.

With parts of the country under water, Met Eireann forecaster Pat Clarke said rainfall in general over the past week has hit three times the normal level in the worst impacted areas. Hardest hit were north Munster, parts of the midlands and east Connacht suffered the worst.

Rainfall levels recorded at Gurteen were 316pc ahead of the normal readings for the time of year, with 68mm over the past week.

Mr Clarke said the forecast for the immediate future is changeable and unsettled, with the western half of the country due to experience the heaviest of the rain, particularly along the Atlantic seaboard.

A slurry tanker helps drain flood water. Picture: Peter Ormond
A slurry tanker helps drain flood water. Picture: Peter Ormond

He said the majority of soils were saturated and it was likely to worsen.

The wet weather is adding to the fodder pressures being experienced by farmers in the west and north-west.

The Department of Agriculture is understood to be finalising a scheme for subsidising the long-distance transport of fodder to stricken areas.

Agriculture Minister Michael Creed said there would be a subsidy in place for affected farmers in badly-hit areas.

Also Read


Read also: 'It's amazing how generous people are when they realise you are in trouble' 

He said Teagasc had already carried out an analysis of farms who were likely to have an issue with fodder shortage.

The farm organisations have called for the scheme to be put in place without delay.

The IFA’s Padraic Joyce said a meal voucher scheme would have been best but in its absence the transport subsidy must be fast-tracked.

Roads throughout Galway are flooded after heavy rainfall yesterday and farmers are on standby to face more problems as rain continues Photo: Hany Marzouk
Roads throughout Galway are flooded after heavy rainfall yesterday and farmers are on standby to face more problems as rain continues Photo: Hany Marzouk

Meanwhile, LacPatrick has secured a significant volume of quality maize silage for its suppliers in Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. The price is below market value, with a minimum delivery of a 30t load and the price of the maize will be deducted in four equal shares from four milk cheques.

Indo Farming



Top Stories